Managing office romances - December 2011

Knowledge @ Australian School of Business

"Managing Office Romance: Is There a Policy for Mixing Business With Pleasure?"
Freelance business writer: Chris Sheedy
Editor: Deborah Tarrant
1900 words

Office romances are often seen by management as off-limits, too hot to handle – better to ignore them and hope they work out rather than implement policies and guidelines around such a private and personal matter. But a badly-managed or unmanaged relationship can negatively affect everybody around the couple through issues such as favouritism, conflicts of interest, pillow talk, lack of trust and even legal and occupational health and safety issues for the organisation. In this story, several experts come together to give their advice on managing this very sensitive subject.


When customer focus is bad for business - Dec 2011

Knowledge @ Australian School of Business

"Beyond Specialisation: How Businesses Benefit When Opposites Attract"
Freelance business writer: Chris Sheedy
Editor: Deborah Tarrant
2200 words

The notion that people within a business cannot excel at everything typically prompts organisations to pursue particular orientations. They may be "customer focused" or put "employees first". Some are "adaptable" while others are "systems driven". However, new research from the Australian School of Business is challenging traditional business logic by revealing that ambidextrous organisations – those that adopt a more flexible approach and embrace the opposites – are more successful in terms of business performance, customer loyalty and staff engagement. Ambidexterity means more than being adaptable, it is about seeing value in the opposites, then striving to achieve them.

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Good customer service - November 2011

Knowledge @ Australian School of Business

"Do You Really Want Fries With That? How to Find a Customer Service Perfect Match"
Freelance business writer: Chris Sheedy
Editor: Deborah Tarrant
2000 words

The attitudes and styles of customer service reps may present a perfect match for some customers, and just get up others' noses. New research from the Australian School of Business pinpoints three different perceptions of good customer service among frontline employees. Each is right in certain circumstances, but can be damaging when misplaced. With more customer touch points in today's organisations, the trick is in recruiting sales and service personnel to suit and then ensuring a one-size-fits-all approach to training does not impinge their beneficial attributes.

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